RED FLAG 14 Aircraft Highlights

2014-02-14  Red Flag gives aircrews and air support operations service members from various airframes, military services and allied countries an opportunity to integrate and practice combat operations.

More than 440,000 service members participated in RED FLAG since 1975, including more than 145,000 aircrew members flying more than 385,000 sorties and logging more than 660,000 flight hours.

RED FLAG gives Airmen an opportunity to experience realistic combat scenarios to prepare and train Airmen in the event of future conflicts or war. Gen. Robert Dixon, then commander of Tactical Air Command, established RED FLAG in 1975 to better prepare Airmen for combat missions.

The concept of RED FLAG was developed by Maj. Moody Suter to simulate the first 10 combat missions pilots would face.

Red Flag provides airmen from U.S. and allied countries an opportunity to experience realistic combat scenarios. RED FLAG has expanded to incorporate all spectrums of warfare to include command and control, real-time intelligence, analysis and exploitation, and electronic warfare.

Red Flag is a realistic combat training exercise involving the air forces of the United States and its allies, and is conducted on the vast bombing and gunnery ranges of the 2.9M acre Nevada Test and Training Range.

Red Flag gives aircrews and air support operations service members from various airframes, military services and allied countries an opportunity to integrate and practice combat operations.

RED FLAG is a simulated battlefield where aircrews hone the skills to survive, and thrive, in a high-threat environment.

More than 125 aircraft from the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, Royal Australian Air Force, and Royal Air Force of the United Kingdom will participate in the advance training, improving integration and interoperability amongst our joint and allied partners.

The return of RED FLAG to the Nevada Test and Training Range is an important step in rebuilding the combat capability of America’s Combat Air Forces.

The first plane is a Royal Australian Air Force Wedgetail E-7A Airborne Early Warning and Control aircraft assigned to RAAF Williamtown, lands during Red Flag 14-1 Feb. 6, at Nellis AFB, Nev.

The second plane is a Royal Air Force Typhoon assigned to RAF Leuchars, United Kingdom, lands during Red Flag 14-1 Feb. 6, at Nellis AFB, Nev.

The third planes are two U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptors assigned to the 27th Fighter Squadron, Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., pass overhead on approach to Nellis during Red Flag 14-1 Feb. 6, at Nellis AFB. Nev.

The fourth plane is a KC-135 assigned to the 92nd Air Refueling Wing, Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash., coming in for a landing during Red Flag 14-1 Feb. 6, at Nellis AFB, Nev.

The fifth plane is a U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor assigned the 27th Fighter Squadron Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., landing during Red Flag 14-1 Feb. 6, at Nellis AFB, Nev.

The sixth plane is a U.S. Navy EA-18G Growler landing during Red Flag 14-1 Feb 6, at Nellis AFB, Nev.

The seventh plane is a U.S. Air Force B-2 Spirit assigned to the 13th Bomb Squadron at Whiteman AFB, Mo., lands during Red Flag 14-1 Feb 6, at Nellis AFB, Nev.

The B-2 is a multi-role bomber capable of delivering both conventional and nuclear munitions.

The eighth plane is an E-3 Sentry airborne warning and control system aircraft assigned to the 964th Airborne Air Control Squadron, Tinker AFB, Okla., coming in for a landing during Red Flag 14-1 Feb 6, at Nellis AFB, Nev.

The ninth plane is a U.S. Marine Corps EA-6B assigned to Marine Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron 4, Marine Corps Station Cherry Point, N.C., landing during Red Flag 14-1 Feb 6, at Nellis AFB, Nev.

The tenth plane is an EC-130 from the 43rd Electronic Combat Squadron, Davis-Monthan AFB, Ariz., coming in for a landing during Red Flag 14-1 Feb 6, at Nellis AFB, Nev.

The eleventh plane is a Royal Air Force E-3 Sentry assigned to RAF Waddington, United Kingdom lands during Red Flag 14-1 Feb. 6, at Nellis AFB, Nev.

The E-3 Sentry provides situational awareness of friendly, neutral and hostile activity, command and control of an area of responsibility, battle management of theater forces, all-altitude and all-weather surveillance of the battle space, and early warning of enemy during joint, allied and coalition operations.

99th Air Base Wing Public Affairs

2/6/14

"If everyone is thinking alike, someone isn’t thinking."

—General George Patton Jr.

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