Tanking a B-2 at Night: Todd Miller Shares the Experience

2017-10-09 By Todd Miller

“It’s go time!”

The crew announcement snaps me from my sleep.

It’s near zero hundred and we fly in dark skies over western Missouri.

The anticipation amps up on FORCE 26, a 305th Air Mobility Wing (AMW) KC-10 from Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, NJ (JBMDL).

I hurriedly gather my camera equipment and follow the crew to the refueling station.

FORCE 26 skims the top of a storm front, slipping in and out of clouds.  The KC-10 rattles, thumps and bounces in the bone jarring turbulence.

I struggle to get seated and configure my camera for a hopeful, if not mercilessly difficult shot.

I can see nothing but heavy grey clouds below and deep black skies behind.

Unseen, three thirsty Spirits are surely closing quickly.

To my right the boom operator, Senior Master Sergeant Carl Wise buckles in.  Wise has 10 years on the boom but an eighteen-month hiatus requires his requalification. Tonight, is his check ride.

To his right sits active instructor and assessor, Tech Sergeant Adam Sochia.  Sochia watches closely as Wise moves through system checks.  An audible alarm sounds and warning light flashes.  Oh no, not possibly now…

No additional drama required, but tonight we have it in spades.

Outwardly Wise and Sochia appear calm, proficient and thorough, but the tension in their voices is palpable.  Radios crackle between Wise and the flight crew in the KC-10 cockpit.  They too have noted the alarm, and together discuss appropriate action.

Despite years of experience Wise is now tested by the system and the conditions.  His decision making and skills evaluated during in-flight refueling with the USAF’s most prized asset – in turbulent air at visibility limits.

Wise extends the boom and verifies complete movement and control.

Check.

Proceed.

Eyes outward, I am only peripherally aware of their challenges.

I have my own.

I frantically move through camera settings – looking for something, anything that will work in darkness beyond what I had imagined.  Autofocus is out of the question, ISO settings through the roof, lens wide open, shutter speeds impossibly low….  I am out of time.

BAT 71 draws near at constant speed, her strobes flashing and command module glowing.

Is she beast, or some machine from the future?  Whatever the case, these are her skies and she rises through the fog like a wraith to take …. our fuel.

Before she can connect we slip into the clouds.

I discern her outline a mere 100 ft off the boom, some 150 ft away.  Enshrouded in cloud she stops and holds position, as if to study her prey before moving in.

We cut in and out of cloud catching glimpses of her dark and mysterious form.

Wisps of cloud flash eerily over her wings like flowing grey hair.  City lights reappear as the jagged robe of her trailing edge passes by.  We bounce and rattle through the skies, while BAT 71 glides smoothly behind.

This unearthly Spirit is at home in the dark and turbulent skies.

Sights like this may be common for boom operators, but leave a stark imprint on my mind and experience.

Surreal, Supernatural, Magic – no word, no description is adequate.

Yet make no mistake, in another place and at another time encountering three wraiths can only mean one thing – the impending doom of someone or something.

The B-2 Spirit is both the ultimate global deterrent and Grim Reaper.

Radios crackle, “Kansas City Center, FORCE 26, request climb to clear weather.”  “FORCE 26, Kansas City Center cleared to climb and work airspace block 23 – to 28,000 ft.”  “Climbing to work airspace block 23 – 28,000 ft. FORCE 26”

The KC-10 starts upward and BAT 71 follows as if suspended just off boom.

Breaking free from the clouds we find smooth, clear air.  Wise, now in control of the refueling operation clears BAT 71 to connect.  The Spirit slides forward.  Though close to her home at Whiteman AFB, MO the B-2 Spirit has been aloft for near four hours and requests thousands of pounds of fuel.

Small talk non-existent, gas and go with a B-2 is often done with no words exchanged.  In the best conditions an air to air connect is no simple task.

It is a choreography of dance between aircraft of all types and sizes – the two platforms briefly becoming one.  The team on both sides of this boom are seasoned professionals and make this connect look as easy as walking up and shaking hands.

BAT 71 is on the boom and I ponder her mystery.

Operated by the 509th Bomb Wing at Whiteman AFB the B-2 is the premier platform of the United States Air Force Global Strike Command (AFGSC).  Invisible by night, the stealthy B-2 bomber can penetrate heavily defended airspace and deliver a punishing knock-out blow.

Traveling around the globe from Whiteman AFB, the Spirit is well known to fly missions of over 24 hours.

Earlier this year the B-2 recorded a mission of over 30 hours requiring 15 aerial refuelings!

The 305th AMW and their force of KC-10 tankers at JBMDL enable the Global Reach of the USAF.  On this mission we fly with crew from the 32nd Air Refueling Squadron (ARS) with the clear and accurate motto “Linking the Continents.”  It is a simple fact, without units like the 305th AMW the Global Reach of the USAF would be severely diminished.

The importance and value of the mission is not lost on boom operators like Wise, who comments “a boom operators job offers instant satisfaction.  

Every time we refuel an aircraft we enable it to complete its mission, whether in training, combat, or humanitarian relief.”

This job satisfaction explains why I find myself with 3 very experienced boom operators.  All three are Instructors, including Master Sergeant Jessica Stockwell with 11 years’ experience.

The three are passionate and have found tremendous rewards in service.  Stockwell notes that it is an incredible team effort from the maintenance group to the entire crew on the aircraft.

As it relates specifically to her role as in-flight refueler she says, “during preparation and flight the 2 pilots and flight engineer are responsible for everything that happens in the cockpit, the in-flight refueler is responsible for everything that happens outside the cockpit, air to air refueling, cargo, people and more.  It is very rewarding to have that mission responsibility.”

Buffeted by turbulence BAT 71 drops briefly off the boom.  As the turbulence subsides she slides back making another connect look effortless.  This Spirit is not leaving without getting all her intended fuel.  The entire encounter speaks of planning, precision and the utmost professionalism.

Dropping off the boom a final time, BAT 71 disappears into the night.

Under duress, SMSgt Wise passes his review and moves forward toward instructor requalification.

Sochia and Stockwell fuel BAT 72 & BAT 73.  Time passes too quickly. Their thirst satisfied the bombers disappear into the dark skies to destination(s) unknown.

This was a training mission.

In the same fashion, the Spirits loaded with deadly ordnance which bcould be destined to strike a target on the other side of the globe.

B-2 Spirits are each identified with a unique U.S. State, such as “The Spirit of Missouri.”

I always considered the name “Spirit” in such context.

Zero Hundred, October 3 has forever changed my perspective.

“Spirit” as perhaps was always intended, is; “one emerging from the clouds, lights glowing, hair flowing, mysterious, ghostly – and most certainly, deadly.”

The Second Line of Defense team expresses gratitude to the 305th AMW, the 32nd ARS, Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst Public Affairs Team Shaun Eagan, SrA Lauren Russell, A1C Zachary Martyn, the exceptional team of in-flight refuelers and entire flight crew of FORCE 26!  All professionals through and through in the finest sense.

"If everyone is thinking alike, someone isn’t thinking."

—General George Patton Jr.

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